Arthritis

5 of the Best Tips for Preventing Arthritis in Your Hands

If you are like most people, your hands are probably not something you consider much. This is, in particular, true if you are a person who works with your hands. However, if you have arthritis, even the simplest of duties may be difficult for you to complete.

Here are five of the best tips for preventing arthritis in your hands:

1. Manage Your Weight, and Your Body Will Thank You

Your whole body has to be held up by your knees. In many ways, being overweight or obese can hurt them. If you’re just 10 pounds overweight, every step you take puts an extra 30 to 60 pounds of pressure on your knees.

With proper teaching and your own commitment, you can lose weight if you eat well and exercise.

2. Protect Your Joints

Joint problems could be caused by lifting heavy things, squatting, and going up and down stairs. Lifting can be very taxing on joints. Workers who squat, kneel, or climb stairs are more likely to have knee Osteoarthritis (OA) than those who don’t.

Standing a lot or being in a vibrating location might also cause OA. Joint difficulties are common in construction, cleaning, farming, metalwork, and floor-laying.

Sitting correctly can protect your joints from daily stress. For example, lift with your hips and knees, not your back, when you pick something up. Don’t carry things too close to your body because it will hurt your wrists.

3. Treat Any Kind of Wound or Infection

When germs like bacteria and viruses make you sick, you don’t just cough and sneeze. Some of these germs can also get into your joints and lead to arthritis.

Arthritis caused by bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus (Staph) is known as septic arthritis. These germs enter the bloodstream and reach the joint or the fluid surrounding it. You can treat this kind of arthritis with antibiotics.

4. Try to Live an Ergonomic Lifestyle

You can keep your sore joints from worsening by making your home and office more ergonomic. And if you have to sit for a long time at work, support your back, knees, and arms.

Put your computer monitor at arm’s length and 15 degrees below your line of sight to avoid neck strain. Use a keyboard and mouse to avoid strain on your hands and arms.

Choose a chair for your office with a nice backrest and a headrest. Straighten your back and place your feet on the floor or a footrest. Armrests should be 90 degrees and wrists straight.

5. Watch Your Blood Sugar

Both arthritis and diabetes are linked in two ways. Studies say that 47 percent of adults in the United States who have diabetes also have arthritis. Arthritis increases diabetes risk by 61%.

Being overweight, inactive, or elderly increases your risk of arthritis or diabetes.

High blood sugar may cause low-grade inflammation in the body. It also contributes to making reactive oxygen species (ROS). These chemicals help the joints make cytokines, which are proteins that cause inflammation.

Diabetes can hurt nerves and eyes, so treating it and monitoring your blood sugar levels is important. There’s also evidence that treating diabetes may decrease the progression of OA.

Conclusion

If you start to feel pain, stiffness, or swelling in your joints, you should see a doctor or rheumatologist. Most of the time, arthritis causes damage that gets worse over time. This means that the longer you wait for treatment, the more damage can happen to the joint.

A specialist might be able to suggest some treatments or changes to your lifestyle that can slow the progress of your arthritis and keep you mobile.

We can assist you if you’re looking for an arthritis doctor in New Jersey. At the Center for Arthritis and Osteoporosis, Dr. Adenwalla and her team use the best treatment methods and diagnostic tools to manage the disease. We recognize that having Arthritis or an autoimmune condition can be tremendously distressing. Contact us today to learn more or to schedule an appointment!

Arthritis

3 Common Types of Arthritis You Should Know for Better Home Care For Seniors

When people think of arthritis in seniors, most know about osteoarthritis, but did you know that there are more than 100 forms of this joint disease. By knowing all the forms of arthritis, we can better understand the individual’s problem and how it will affect them.

What is Arthritis?

Arthritis is a term used for a group of painful diseases that cause inflammation of the joints. The symptoms can include pain, inflammation, joint stiffness, deformity, and loss of joint function. It is a breakdown of collagen, a protein used to build the cells in our joints. An inflammatory process occurs in the joints, which causes them to become stiff, painful, and swollen.

Unfortunately, there is no cure for arthritis, but several ways exist to manage the symptoms and slow down its development. But first, it’s important to know about the other types of arthritis, so you can better help your elderly loved ones find relief. 

What are the Common Types of Arthritis?

1. Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is also referred to as a degenerative joint disease. Osteoarthritis is commonly used to describe the pain associated with cartilage breakdown around the body’s joints.

The cartilage in the joints becomes torn and causes the bones to rub against each other. This causes pain and swelling, which inhibits joint function and movement.

Once you have osteoarthritis, it’s never going to go away. The good news is that you can manage the pain and stiffness through medication, exercise, and rehabilitation. Usually, you’ll have to work closely with your care team to develop the best treatment plan for you.

2. Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

The main difference between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis is the cause. While osteoarthritis is the cartilage breakdown, RA results from an autoimmune attack on the body. It’s referred to as an autoimmune disease because the body’s immune system produces antibodies that attack healthy tissues in the joints.

People with RA often notice more inflammation and swelling. They also experience more pain, as well as stiffness in their joints. While this type of arthritis can affect many joints, it most commonly affects the hands and feet. Treatment for RA includes medications and physical therapy.

3. Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis can affect one or many joints, but it has the same symptoms as RA, such as pain and inflammation. Psoriatic arthritis is caused by psoriasis, a disease that causes scaly patches of skin and swelling around the joints. Psoriasis usually affects the scalp, knees, elbows, and lower back.

Psoriatic arthritis can be challenging to diagnose, as symptoms can appear years after the psoriasis is diagnosed. It develops in about 15 percent of people with psoriasis. Treatment for this type of arthritis is the same as RA.

The Bottom Line: Caring for Seniors with Arthritis and Knowing their Different Needs

While knowing exactly what type of arthritis someone has is tough, you can better help them manage their symptoms. Once you know what type of arthritis they have, you can better help them handle the pain and stiffness.

Many people with arthritis also suffer from depression and anxiety, as it can be hard to live with a disease that has no cure and causes such pain. Take the time to learn about the different types of arthritis, so you can better help your senior loved one.

Are You Looking for Carpal Tunnel Injection in NJ?

We are a center for arthritis and osteoporosis with numerous treatments like carpal tunnel injection in NJ. Our goal is to help you to get back to your life without pain, so get in touch with us to see how we can boost your health in more ways than one. 

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Dreadful Signs, Symptoms, Causes, and Treatments for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is caused by compression of the median nerve, typically by a swollen ligament or inflammation of the tendons surrounding it. Numbness and tingling in the wrist, hand, or fingers (excluding the ring finger) are symptoms of the syndrome. If you are looking for more information on carpal tunnel syndrome, this is the article for you!

Signs, Symptoms, Causes, and Treatments for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

The carpal tunnel is the passageway that allows the median nerve to travel from the forearm to the hand. It is bounded by the carpal bones, flexor retinaculum, and the transverse carpal ligament.

The median nerve is the major nerve in hand. It controls sensation in the ring and small fingers, thumb, and half of the palm. It also allows you to move the thumb and all four fingers.

The median nerve is surrounded by a very small space called the carpal canal. When swelling happens, the carpal tunnel narrows, putting pressure on the median nerve and resulting in pressure on the median nerve.

What Are the Symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

There are many different symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, including:

Wrist pain

Tingling, dull or burning pain in the thumb, index or middle finger, or half of the palm

Paralysis of the thumb or fingers

Loss of sensation in the thumb, index or middle finger, or half of the palm

How Does Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Develop?

Carpal tunnel syndrome is thought to be caused by compression of the median nerve. Compression of the nerve can be caused by:

Tight or swollen ligaments or tendons

Inflammation of ligaments or tendons

Bony outgrowths

Injury to the wrist

Carpal tunnel syndrome is more common in people who:

Are pregnant or nursing

Have diabetes

Are overweight

Have a wrist injury or overuse injury

Have a family history of carpal tunnel syndrome

What Treatment Options Are Available?

If you are experiencing the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, you may have a cortisone injection in your wrist. A cortisone injection will temporarily relieve the pressure on the median nerve. This allows the nerve to heal.

If the condition is caused by too much swelling, you may also be treated with a steroid injection.

Surgery is an option, too. However, it should only be used when other treatments have failed to help. Carpal tunnel surgery is commonly called carpal tunnel release. During this procedure, the carpal ligament will be cut to widen the carpal tunnel and reduce pressure on the median nerve.

In some cases, surgery can be avoided. If you have carpal tunnel syndrome caused by an overuse injury, your doctor may recommend that you rest your wrist or wear a splint.

Conclusion

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common problem. If you are experiencing symptoms of the syndrome, you should see your doctor for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. In most cases, the syndrome will respond to conservative treatment, but in some cases, surgery may be recommended. Once the source of carpal tunnel syndrome is found and treated, you can get back to living your normal life.

Should you be in need of a carpal tunnel injection, come to the Center for Arthritis and Osteoporosis. Dr. Adenwalla and her team adopt the finest treatment procedures and diagnostic modalities to manage disease states. We understand that living with Arthritis and autoimmune diseases can be an extremely stressful experience. With compassion and care, and employment employing high-end medical technologies like radiographs, MRIs, and ultrasound, we work to support our patients in their journey from pain to recovery.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

8 Different Brutal Occupations That Impact Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is usually accompanied by chronic pain. While others may not always experience debilitating levels, such symptoms can definitely pose some difficulty if not properly treated. The overall severity and frequency of the pain can affect a person’s quality of life, especially when performing daily activities in your employment. 

Certain occupations can cause or impact carpal tunnel syndrome. For example:

1) Manufacturers

Workers in the manufacturing industry who engage in repetitive assembly line work often experience carpal tunnel syndrome. Other factors that may contribute to the development of this condition are long work hours and hand-eye coordination necessary to produce the products that have to be created.

2) Construction Contractors

Construction workers and contractors often have to work with heavy equipment, carry heavy materials, and use their hands a lot. Carpal tunnel syndrome can often result from such conditions. If you show symptoms of this condition, you may find relief when using a hand brace or wrist support during work and connecting with a professional for treatment.

3) Food Service Employees

People working in the food service industry have to handle utensils and plates a lot. They are also required to engage in a lot of hand-eye coordination for preparing and serving food and beverage, especially as the chef. All these factors can contribute to the development of carpal tunnel syndrome.

4) IT and Data Entry Staff

Employees who work in the IT industry for data entry or just about anyone who does heavy computer work can experience certain symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. With an immobile wrist and staying in the same position for hours on end, it can cause strain on the wrist and eventually contribute to chronic pain.

5) Beauticians and Hair Stylists

Beauticians and hair stylists are required to work in the same position for a very long period of time. Your hands and wrists can be subject to overworking due to using many tools for hair and nail treatments, waxing, and massages. This is often accompanied by lifting and carrying things for customers.

6) Sports Athletes

Playing sports like tennis, golf, baseball, and gymnastics can be great, but it’s important to recognize the risks of developing carpal tunnel syndrome. Because sports are competitive, athletes tend to overwork their hands and fingers when training their skills. Athletes now use hand braces and wrist support to prevent and cope.

7) Artists and Musicians

Painters, sculptors, musicians, and more often have to use their hands to create their art and music. Repeated use of their hands for different tasks and motions can lead to carpal tunnel syndrome, though, even during practice sessions. Most artists also have to work in the same position for long periods of time.

8) Healthcare Professionals

People working in the healthcare industry, specifically doctors and dentists, are unfortunately vulnerable to carpal tunnel syndrome as well. This is because professionals in this field must work long hours and use their hands and wrists to manipulate their tools and instruments in performing procedures.

Conclusion

Carpal tunnel syndrome is often a condition that may go undiagnosed since many people disregard their pain as part of their job. However, it’s important to recognize it as early as possible to start treating the condition immediately.

In need of a carpal tunnel injection in NJ? At the Center for Arthritis & Osteoporosis, Dr. Adenwalla and her team adopt the finest treatment procedures and diagnostic modalities to manage different disease states like carpal tunnel syndrome. Contact us now!

gout

Understanding the Causes, Symptoms, and Risks Of Gout

Anyone can develop gout, a common and complicated form of arthritis. One or more joints, most frequently the big toe, experience sudden, intense bouts of pain, swelling, redness, and tenderness.

Gout attacks can come on abruptly, frequently causing you to wake up in the middle of the night feeling as though your big toe is on fire. Even the weight of the bedsheet may appear terrible on the affected joint, which is heated, swollen, and extremely sensitive.

In the sections below, learn more about gout, what causes it, and the risks associated with the condition.

Causes

The inflammation and excruciating pain of a gout episode is brought on by the accumulation of urate crystals in your joint. When your blood has a lot of uric acid, urate crystals can develop. Purines, which are naturally occurring chemicals in your body, are broken down by your body to form uric acid.

Some foods, such as red meat and organ meats like liver, contain purines as well. Anchovies, sardines, mussels, scallops, trout, and tuna are some examples of seafood high in purines. 

Higher uric acid levels are encouraged by alcoholic beverages, particularly beer and liquids sweetened with fruit sugar.

In a healthy person, uric acid dissolves in the blood and is excreted in the urine by the kidneys. However, your body occasionally secretes too little uric acid, or your kidneys create too much. 

A joint or the tissue around it may develop pointed, needle-like urate crystals as a result of uric acid buildup, which can result in swelling, pain, and inflammation.

Symptoms

Gout attacks nearly generally come on quickly, frequently at night. These are a few of them.

  • Intense joint pain: Gout can affect any joint but typically affects the big toe. The elbows, wrists, fingers, ankles, and knees are other joints that are frequently impacted. 

The pain is likely to be at its worst four to twelve hours after it begins.

  • Persistent Pain: Some joint soreness may last for a few days to a few weeks after the most intense pain has subsided. Later episodes are probably more prolonged and likely to involve more joints.

Joint swelling, tenderness, warmth, and redness result from the inflammation.

  • Limited range of motion: As gout gets worse, you can find it difficult to move your joints regularly.

Risks

If your body contains excessive quantities of uric acid, you are more prone to develop gout. Diet, weight, health issues, some medications, family history, age, sex, and recent surgery or trauma are a few things that can raise your body’s uric acid levels.

Consuming foods and beverages sweetened with fruit sugar and eating a lot of red meat and shellfish raise uric acid levels, which raise your risk of developing gout. The risk is also increased by alcohol consumption, particularly beer.

Being overweight causes your body to manufacture more uric acid and makes it harder for your kidneys to get rid of it.

Your risk of gout is increased by a few illnesses and circumstances as well. Untreated high blood pressure and chronic illnesses like diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and heart and renal disease are some examples of these.

Low-dose aspirin and several drugs used to treat hypertension such as thiazide diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and beta-blockers can also raise blood uric acid levels. 

The use of anti-rejection medications that doctors provide to organ transplant recipients can also prevent rejection.

You are more prone to get gout if other family members have the condition. Men also have gout more frequently than women do, partly because women’s uric acid levels are typically lower. However, after menopause, women’s uric acid levels begin to resemble those of men.

A gout attack can occasionally be brought on by recent surgery or trauma. A flare-up can also occur in some patients after having a vaccine.

Conclusion

If you get sudden, severe joint discomfort, contact your doctor. If left untreated, gout can harm joints and cause severe pain. If you have a fever and a hot, swollen joint that feels infected, get medical help right once.

If you need gout treatment like an ultrasound-guided joint injection in New Jersey, be sure to visit the Center for Arthritis & Osteoporosis. 

We adopt the finest treatment procedures and diagnostic modalities to manage disease states, working to support our patients from pain to recovery. Contact us today for a consultation.

Arthritis

Everything You Need to aware about Arthritis is in the Fingers

The human body is a fragile object. No matter how minor a problem, it can always lead to bigger issues. If left unaddressed, they can lead to a condition affecting the quality of life. Of course, this applies to all body parts, even our hands. Among the many issues our hands face, arthritis in the fingers is among the more common ones.

Arthritis is when the cartilage discs between joints break down, resulting in swelling and pain. This can be caused by aging, overuse, or joint injury. There are three types of arthritis: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PA), and osteoarthritis. While all are seemingly the same, their effects are different from each other because there are instances when tendons and ligaments are affected. Because of this, one must know the signs of arthritis and treatment options.

Symptoms of Arthritis in the Fingers

Aside from pain and swelling, other signs of arthritis include:

Stiffness

Stiffness around the joints is one of the most common signs of arthritis. This is because joints experience a general lack of movement, causing stiffness and causing one to experience discomfort.

Deformed Joints

The joint deformity occurs when the cartilage around the joints breaks down, and the bones aren’t held in place. With this, they can move and cause the joints to become less stable.

Bone Spurs

Bone spurs can develop between the joints if the bones gradually grind against each other. This can cause pain since the spaces of the joints are being filled up.

Mucous Cysts

Mucous cysts form when the joints are constantly swollen. This causes the joints to become stiff, making them feel like they are being filled with a lump.

Frequent Popping Sounds

Popping sounds are relatively common, especially when you stretch or repeatedly pop your fingers. However, if the popping sound is heard frequently when there isn’t any activity, it could be a symptom of arthritis.

Warm Feeling

When there’s an onset of arthritis, you may feel warm around your joints. This is because of the inflammation and swelling around the affected area.

Treatment Options

While getting arthritis is a daunting thought, the good news is that different treatment options are available. These include:

Medications

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) relieve pain and inflammation. However, there are times when steroids are prescribed because of the severity of the condition.

In some cases, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are prescribed because they not only relieve pain and inflammation but also slow down the breakdown of the cartilage.

Physical Therapy

Physical therapy can help in the management of arthritis. It is one way to slow down the progression of the condition. It allows the joints to move and stay flexible and relaxes the muscles in the affected area.

Additionally, it can help by improving the strength of the muscles to support the joint. It can also help the muscle become more flexible to enhance the range of motion.

Surgery

Surgery is a last-resort option, and it’s rarely used because of how invasive it is. It removes the affected part of the joint, making way for more cartilage to grow again. This can provide relief, but it will also result in losing mobility in the affected joint.

In some cases, joint replacement surgery is performed. This involves replacing the affected joint with either a prosthetic joint or transplanting the affected area with another part of your body.

Preventing Arthritis

If you want to prevent arthritis in the fingers, exercise is vital. You will want to keep your hands and fingers as much as possible, but don’t overdo it. Also, take note of any activities you do and see if they are causing pain. If they are, you’ll want to stop or avoid them altogether.

Additionally, you will want to avoid certain activities that can cause the condition. These include overusing your fingers, especially if they perform the same work. You will want to ensure you’re not overusing any part of your fingers, whether it’s your thumbs, index, or middle finger.

Conclusion

Hand arthritis is not a condition you want to have, but it should be taken seriously. It’s better to have it treated early before it becomes more severe. With proper treatment, one can reduce the pain and discomfort. All that matters is seeking medical attention to ensure that you can take the best course of action.

If you’re looking for arthritis specialists in New Jersey, the Center for Arthritis and Osteoporosis is the place for you! Our healthcare specialists will ensure that your condition is managed appropriately through extensive and comprehensive treatment programs. S

Rheumatoid Arthritis

How Does Seasonal Change Affect Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms?

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder of the joints caused by an overactive immune system. In people with RA, the immune system attacks the lining of the joints, causing pain, stiffness, and swelling. Some people with RA notice that symptoms typically worsen during certain times of the year. 

For example, people with RA may experience sharp increases in symptoms in winter or summer. Although there is evidence to suggest that seasonal weather changes affect symptoms, the exact reason for this is unknown.

What Is an RA Flare?

People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience periods of intense symptoms, including a flare. During a flare, a person with RA will experience the following symptoms:

Flares of symptoms are followed by periods when the symptoms abate. According to the Arthritis Foundation, doctors and people with rheumatoid arthritis may disagree about what constitutes a flare-up.

Most people with arthritis define a flare-up as a period when their symptoms worsen and cause them to miss social and work engagements. To doctors, a flare-up is defined as a period of significant joint involvement and substantial changes in laboratory work.

Flares can sometimes occur without any known reason. However, they can also be triggered by things like:

  • food, though there is no evidence to back up any specific food triggers of RA
  • infections or other medical issues
  • a person’s mood or stress level
  • increased physical activity
  • weather 

How Weather May Trigger a Flare

Evidence suggests that changing weather or seasonal patterns may affect a person’s RA symptoms. The reasons for this aren’t clear; some possibilities include:

  • Changes in barometric pressure during a cold front can bring on the pain and stiffness that people living with arthritis live with.
  • Low temperatures may make the joints stiffer and harder to move.
  • People may be less active in colder weather, worsening their RA symptoms.
  • Extreme weather conditions can dampen a person’s mood, which, in turn, can worsen RA symptoms.

How to Cope with Seasonal Flares

Cold winters can stress the immune system, triggering rheumatoid arthritis (RA) flares. Here are some strategies to ease RA if cold weather seems to be the trigger:

1. Dress for the Weather: Research shows that colder weather worsens symptoms in people with arthritis, so wearing warm clothes that retain heat may reduce these symptoms. Heat is lost from the extremities, so wearing a scarf, hat, boots, and gloves is vital in cold weather.

2. Wear Thermal Compression Gloves: The release of heat helps relax the fingers and compress them to reduce swelling. Meanwhile, the gloves help to keep the body heat in.

3. Maintain Exercise Routines: People tend to move less in the winter, but staying physically active is critical for managing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Cardiovascular exercises, strength training, and stretching can help:

  • ease pain and stiffness
  • improve range of motion
  • boost energy levels and mood

4. Talk with a Doctor About Taking a Vitamin D Supplement: People tend to be deficient in vitamin D during winter because the sun is less intense and the air is colder. Lower vitamin D levels in the blood are linked to more severe RA symptoms and skin sensitivity to pain.

5. Use Heat Therapy: Warm compresses, showers, and baths can help you relax your muscles and enhance your pain tolerance.

Conclusion

If seasonal weather changes or other issues affect a person’s RA, they should talk to a doctor. The doctor may recommend increasing medication or making changes in therapy, such as adjustments to the frequency or schedule of medicine.

At the Center for Arthritis and Osteoporosis, Dr. Adenwalla and the team adopt the finest treatment procedures and diagnostic modalities to manage disease states. We understand that living with arthritis and autoimmune diseases can be an extremely stressful experience. We work to support our patients in their journey from pain to recovery with compassion, care, and employment employing high-end medical technologies like radiographs, MRIs, and ultrasound. If you’re looking for arthritis specialists in New Jersey, we’ve got you covered! Get in touch with us today and let us know how we can help!

Arthritis

5 Different Authentic Risk Factors Commonly Associated to Arthritis

About a quarter of US adults have arthritis. Some behaviors and characteristics, or risk factors, increase their chances of developing the disease and make it worse. You can control some of these risk factors, while others you can’t. To lower your chance of getting arthritis or of making it worse, you can change the factors you can control.

Risk Factors You Can Control

1) Obesity 

Obese people are more likely to develop arthritis than people who are not obese. People who are overweight also tend to have more severe and painful arthritis.

The link between arthritis and obesity is strong. If you are overweight, you are up to two times more likely to develop arthritis than someone of normal weight. The good news is that losing even a small amount of weight can improve symptoms. Good health habits, like exercise and eating well, can help prevent obesity and improve your overall health.

2) Infection

An untreated or improperly treated infection can cause arthritis. For example, Lyme disease can cause arthritis or other problems in some people. People with a past infection may also be at greater risk of developing arthritis.

Arthritis symptoms may be triggered by a bacterial, viral, or fungal infection in the joint. Some of these infections, like Lyme disease and hepatitis B, can last for a long time.

3) Smoking

Smoking is a known cause of many health problems, including cancer, heart disease, and respiratory problems. Smoking also causes irritation and swelling in the fingers, wrists, and ankles, which can lead to arthritis.

When you smoke, you increase your chance of developing an inflammatory disease. Also, smoking increases your risk of developing a bacterial infection. If you have diabetes, smoking can make this disease much worse.

Risk Factors You Can’t Control

1) Age

Arthritis is more common in people aged 65 and older. 

Age is a major risk factor for developing arthritis. As people age, their immune system is less effective, which increases the chance of developing an infection. Medical conditions that affect older people more than younger people, like arthritis and diabetes, are more common.

Even if you take good care of yourself, you are likely to develop some kind of arthritis as you get older.

2) Genetics and Traits

If your parent, sibling, or child has RA, you are more likely to develop RA.

Some people are at higher risk of developing arthritis because they have a family history of the disease. If a parent, sibling, or child has RA, you are up to five times more likely to develop this disease. If a parent, a sibling, or a child has osteoarthritis, you are up to three times more likely to develop the disease.

It is not known how your genes are involved in arthritis. If you have a family history of arthritis, it is especially important to get regular checkups, to keep the disease from getting worse.

Conclusion

Understanding the risk factors of arthritis is important to preventing and managing the disease. Some of the risk factors are not in your control. 

If you want to learn more about arthritis prevention, the Center for Arthritis & Osteoporosis can help. We are home to the best arthritis specialists in New Jersey that can give you a proper assessment. Get in touch with us today to learn more. At the Center for Arthritis and Osteoporosis, Dr. Adenwalla and her team adopt the finest treatment procedures and diagnostic modalities to manage disease states. We understand that living with Arthritis and autoimmune diseases can be an extremely stressful experience. We work to support our patients in their journey from pain to recovery with compassion and care. Contact us today to learn more and request an appointment online!

Arthritis joint pain disturbing your day.

Arthritis & it’s five Worst Causes:

Arthritis is a general term for many physical conditions that cause pain and swelling. The joints, which is why we think Arthritis is a general term for many physical conditions that cause pain and swelling in the joints, which is why we believe arthritis is a condition that affects everyone. It is the leading cause of disability worldwide.

In the United States, it affects an estimated 54 million people, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that prevalence rates may be even higher in other parts of the world. However, arthritis is not contagious. It is the body’s response to injury and stress.

Today, let’s explore the most common causes of arthritis. Here’s what you need to know:

Inflammation

Inflammation is the body’s natural response to an external cause or internal problem. In the case of arthritis, it is the result of the body’s response to the breakdown of the cartilage and bone in a joint. The afflicted joint will become swollen, stiff, and painful.

Inflammation is the body’s natural response to an external cause or internal problem. In the case of arthritis, it is the result of the body’s response to the breakdown of the cartilage and bone in a joint. The afflicted joint will become swollen, stiff, and painful.

Cartilage Deterioration

The breakdown of cartilage may be a result of chronic inflammation. Cartilage is a type of tissue that protects and covers the ends of the bones in a joint. The cartilage wears down a little more each time the affected joint moves. Over time, the cartilage may get to the point where it is too thin to protect the bones.

The breakdown of cartilage may be a result of chronic inflammation. Cartilage is a type of tissue that protects and covers the ends of the bones in a joint. The cartilage wears down a little more each time the affected joint moves. Over time, the cartilage may get to the point where it is too thin to protect the bones.

Bone Deterioration

As we age, bones start to wear out, resulting in the loss of the cushioning quality of the joints. This can lead to pain and arthritis. As we age, bones start to wear out, resulting in the loss of the cushioning quality of the joints. This can lead to pain and arthritis.

Immune System Attack

The immune system is the body’s defense against cancer and infections. When arthritis occurs, the body’s immune system attacks the joint and breaks down the cartilage and bone. The immune system is the body’s defense against cancer and infections. When arthritis occurs, the body’s immune system attacks the joint and breaks down the cartilage and bone.

Connective Tissue Damage

Your joints are made up of connective tissue, cartilage, and bone. These tissues support the fluid and lubricant that allow the movement of the joint. Connective tissues can tear or rupture under stress or injury, which can cause arthritis.

Your joints are made up of connective tissue, cartilage, and bone. These tissues support the fluid and lubricant that allow the movement of the joint. Connective tissues can tear or rupture under stress or injury, which can cause arthritis.

The Bottom Line

Arthritis results from many different causes that cause swelling, pain, and stiffness. This makes it difficult to move the affected joint. While there is no cure for arthritis, many treatments help reduce the pain, swelling, and stiffness. If you are looking for an arthritis doctor in New Jersey, we can help you. At the Center for Arthritis and Osteoporosis, Dr. Adenwalla and her team adopt the finest treatment procedures and diagnostic modalities to manage disease states. We understand that living with Arthritis and autoimmune diseases can be an extremely stressful experience. We work to support our patients in their journey from pain to recovery with compassion and care. Contact us today to learn more and request an appointment online!

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Read Why Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Must Be Treated Immediately

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a painful ailment where the median nerve (one that runs throughout your arm and ends in your hand) becomes compressed in the carpal tunnel area of your wrist. This particular nerve controls the movement and feeling of the thumb and fingers, except for the pinky. When this nerve becomes compressed within the carpal tunnel, you will experience discomfort that can disrupt regular movements and even resting periods!

Remedies like massaging and shaking your hand can alleviate symptoms temporarily but are not long-term solutions. If left untreated, CTS can become chronic. Thankfully, more effective means exist, such as a carpal tunnel injection in NJ, but let’s discover more about the need for immediate treatment first.

Seeing the Symptoms

One or more of these could occur at any time. Take special note of them:

  • Over time, you may notice feeling tingling or numbness in your hand. The numbness may shoot up to your elbow and stay there, making it hard to grasp things or hold them tight. 
  • You may find the letters harder to hit accurately when typing on a keyboard.
  • Weakness in your fingers can make it hard to hold things and can speed up the development of arthritis.

Catching the Causes

The causes of most cases of CTS are unknown. However, the most common indicators include age, gender, and comorbidities. Thus, if you are getting older, female, and have existing medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout, your risk for CTS increases. 

The wrist’s movement or positioning can also increase your risk, especially when your hands are below your wrists. More permanent solutions such as a carpal tunnel injection are recommended since they could provide better relief.

Let’s examine these comorbidities even further:

  • Arthritis: In rheumatoid arthritis, thick, swollen tissue builds up around the wrist and can press on the median nerve.
  • Diabetes: Extremely high blood sugar levels in people with diabetes can cause the proteins in carpal tunnel tendons to attach to sugar or glycosylate. This interferes with the tendons’ ability to move freely.
  • Hypothyroidism: Low thyroid levels in the blood can also cause carpal tunnel syndrome by making the soft tissue swell and press on the wrist nerve.
  • Gout: High uric acid levels in the blood can cause gout, a painful condition where crystals build up in joints. The inflammation from gout also causes swelling within the carpal tunnel, compressing a nerve that controls sensation and movement in the hands.

Read These Risks

The following risks also cause CTS:

  • In some cases, tiny bones in the wrist known as carpal bones may be too small or improperly formed, which compresses the median nerve. 
  • Repeated and forceful movements of the hands and wrists may cause further damage to the nerve. 
  • Pregnancy can also stress the median nerve, increasing the risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome. Therefore, women are more likely to develop CTS.
  • Additionally, several other factors increase the risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome. These include being obese, having a body mass index of three or more; being in menopause; and having had a mastectomy. Medical conditions that cause nerve damage or inflammation, such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, hypothyroidism, or lupus, may also increase CTS.

Solve the Problem Before It Triggers Others

Based on the above information, CTS isn’t just an isolated condition. It may indicate another comorbidity or is triggered by one; it may even result from poor lifestyle choices. Never ignore the pain or hide it whenever you notice these symptoms. Seek professional help immediately; you could be solving a few more health concerns along the way.

Book your appointment today at Center for Arthritis & Osteoporosis for a carpal tunnel injection in NJ. Dr. Adenwalla and her team operate with the finest treatment procedures and diagnostic devices to guide patients from pain to recovery. We are medical services you can trust, so visit our website right now and request your appointment!

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