10 Foods to Avoid if You Have Rheumatic Diseases

10 Foods to Avoid if You Have Rheumatic Diseases

Avoiding food triggers that cause inflammation in your body can help reduce pain and stiffness associated with RA.

Dairy Products

Milk products contain casein, an animal protein that has been linked to inflammatory reactions in people who suffer from rheumatoid diseases.

If you have rheumatological disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), you should avoid milk products because they contain casein, which triggers inflammation in the body. Casein is found in cow’s milk, goat’s milk, sheep’s milk, and buffalo’s milk.

Sugar

Dairy products such as milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, and butter are high in saturated fat and cholesterol. These fats can contribute to inflammation and joint pain. In addition, sugar is another common trigger for inflammation.

If you suffer from rheumatoid arthritis, you should be aware of which foods to avoid. The following foods contain sugar: candy, cookies, cakes, pies, doughnuts, pastries, soft drinks, fruit juices, and other sweetened beverages. You should also limit your intake of alcohol, because it contains both sugar and calories.

Processed Meats

If you suffer from rheumatoid diseases, you should avoid processed meats and dairy products. They contain inflammatory substances called cytokines that can cause inflammation and pain.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes inflammation and swelling in joints. RA affects approximately 1 million people in the United States alone. The symptoms of RA include joint stiffness, fatigue, and pain. There is currently no cure for RA, but there are treatments available to help manage the symptoms. One of the most important things you can do to treat RA is to eat a well-balanced diet. A healthy diet includes plenty of fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, and whole grains. Avoid processed meat and dairy products because they contain inflammatory substances called cytokine. These substances can cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Alcohol

There are plenty of alcoholic beverages out there that are good for you. In fact, drinking alcohol has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other serious illnesses. However, not all alcoholic beverages are healthy. Here are some alcoholic beverages that are good for you and others that aren’t so good for you.

Wine is one of the healthiest types of alcohol because it contains antioxidants, which help protect against free radicals. Red wine is particularly good for you because it contains resveratrol, a compound found in red grapes that helps prevent blood clots and lower cholesterol levels. Beer is also a good choice because it’s low in calories and high in nutrients. And while spirits such as vodka and gin contain fewer calories than beer, they’re still higher in sugar than wine.

Fried Food

Fried food is bad for you because it contains trans fats. Trans fats are found in fried foods such as french fries, doughnuts, and potato chips. These fats raise LDL (bad) cholesterol levels and lower HDL (good) cholesterol levels. This means that people who eat fried foods regularly will have higher risks of developing coronary artery disease.

Conclusion

If you’re suffering from Rheumatic Diseases, it’s best to seek help from experts who care about your well-being. At the Center for Arthritis & Osteoporosis, Dr. Humaira Adenwalla a  Board Certified Rheumatologist in NJ is here to help you treat your condition and improve your quality of life. We adopt the finest treatment procedures and diagnostic modalities to manage these conditions. Request an appointment today and let our team help you get on the road to recovery.

seasonal joint pain

Seasonal Joint Pain: What Is It? How To Treat It?

Seasonal joint pain occurs when joints become inflamed due to cold weather, humidity, or other environmental factors. It usually goes away after the season ends.

What Causes Joint Pain During The Winter Months?

There are several reasons why people suffer from seasonal joint pain during winter months. Cold temperatures can cause muscles to contract, which puts pressure on the joints. This can lead to inflammation and swelling. In addition, the lack of sunlight can make vitamin D deficiency more likely, which can also contribute to joint pain.

How Can You Prevent Joint Pain In The First Place?

If you want to prevent seasonal joint pain, you should try to avoid cold weather as much as possible. Try to stay indoors when the temperature drops below 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Also, wear sunscreen every day to protect yourself against the sun. Vitamin D helps keep bones strong, so it’s important for everyone to get enough of it.

How Do I Know If My Joint Pain Is Serious?

If you think you might have arthritis, talk with your doctor. He or she will ask questions about your symptoms and perform tests to determine whether you do indeed have arthritis. You may also need an X-ray to see if there is any damage to your joints.

What Should I Do If I Have A Severe Case Of Joint Pain?

Arthritis is a common condition that affects millions of people worldwide. It occurs when the cartilage between bones wears down, causing inflammation and swelling. This leads to stiffness and pain. There are two main types of arthritis: osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OA usually starts as a result of wear and tear on the joints, while RA is caused by an autoimmune disorder.

How Long Does Joint Pain Last After Treatment?

If you suffer from seasonal joint pain, there are several things you can do to help ease the discomfort. First, make sure you take care of yourself physically. Exercise regularly, eat healthy foods, and sleep well. Second, try using heat therapy to reduce the pain. Heat packs, hot baths, and heating pads work wonders. Third, use ice packs to relieve the pain. Fourth, talk to your doctor about medications that might help with the pain. Finally, consider seeing a chiropractor. They can help you improve your posture and correct any imbalances in your body.

Seasonal joint pain occurs when joints become inflamed due to cold weather, lack of exercise, or other factors. The most common symptoms include stiffness, swelling, and soreness. These symptoms usually go away after a few days, but if they persist, see your doctor. There are many ways to treat seasonal joint pain, such as taking anti-inflammatory medication, icing the affected area, and applying heat therapy. You should also speak to your doctor about any medications you are currently taking. He or she can recommend alternative treatments that might be helpful. Lastly, visit a chiropractor. Chiropractors can help you improve your overall health and correct any imbalancing in your body.

Conclusion

Seasonal joint pain occurs when joints become inflamed due to cold weather, humidity, or other environmental factors. It usually goes away after the season ends.

If you’re suffering from joint pain, it’s best to seek help from experts who care about your well-being. At the Center for Arthritis & Osteoporosis, Dr. Humaira Adenwalla and her team of joint pain specialists in New Jersey are here to help you treat your condition and improve your quality of life. We adopt the finest treatment procedures and diagnostic modalities to manage these conditions. Request an appointment today and let our team help you get on the road to recovery.

Gout

7 Eating and Drinking Tips for Minimizing Gout Flare-Ups

If you’re one of the millions of Americans who suffer from gout, you know that this painful form of arthritis can strike without warning. The sudden onset of intense joint pain, swelling, and inflammation can leave you feeling helpless.

While there is no cure for gout, there are things you can do to minimize the frequency and severity of your flare-ups. In addition to taking medication from an arthritis specialist to control the underlying causes of gout, following these simple tips can help you avoid triggering a flare-up.

1. Avoid High-Purine Foods

Purines are a type of organic compound that is found naturally in some foods. When purines are metabolized, they break down into uric acid. While a small amount of uric acid is necessary for good health, too much can lead to gout.

Foods with high levels of purine include organ meats (liver, kidney, etc.), anchovies, herring, mackerel, sardines, and trout. Other high-purine foods include legumes (peas, beans, lentils), yeast, and alcohol (especially beer).

2. Drink Plenty of Fluids

Drinking fluids helps to flush uric acid out of the body. The best fluids to drink are water and unsweetened juices. Limit your intake of sugary drinks and alcohol, as these can increase uric acid levels. You should aim for 8-10 glasses of water or other non-alcoholic beverages each day.

3. Limit Alcohol Consumption

While moderate alcohol consumption (one or two drinks per day) is not necessarily harmful, excessive alcohol consumption can trigger a gout flare-up. If you drink alcohol, limit yourself to no more than two drinks per day.

4. Limit Your Intake of High-Fructose Foods

Fructose is a type of sugar that is found naturally in fruits and vegetables. It is also added to many processed foods and drinks. Studies have shown that fructose can increase uric acid levels in the blood. This may be due to the fact that fructose is metabolized differently than other types of sugar. Therefore, it is best to limit your intake of high-fructose foods, such as candy, soda, and fruit juice.

5. Eat Plenty of High-Fiber Foods

Fiber is a type of carbohydrate that the body cannot digest. It is found in plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

Fiber has many health benefits, including the ability to lower uric acid levels. This may be due to the fact that fiber binds to uric acid in the gut and prevents it from being absorbed into the bloodstream.

6. Avoid Crash Diets

Crash diets are very low-calorie diets that are not sustainable in the long term. They often lead to rapid weight loss, which can trigger gout. If you are overweight or obese, it is best to lose weight slowly and steadily. This will minimize your risk of developing gout.

7. Limit Your Intake of Red Meat

Red meat is a good source of protein, iron, and other nutrients. However, it is also high in purines. Therefore, it is best to limit your intake of red meat, especially if you are prone to gout. If you do eat red meat, it is best to choose lean cuts and avoid processed meats, such as bacon, sausage, and ham.

Conclusion

Gout is a common form of inflammatory arthritis that can cause flare-ups of pain, swelling, and inflammation in the joints. These flare-ups can be triggered by certain foods and drinks, so it’s important to be aware of what you’re eating and drinking if you have gout. If you’re having frequent or severe flare-ups, talk to your doctor about other treatment options.

If you’re suffering from gout or other forms of arthritis, it’s best to seek help from experts who care about your well-being. At the Center for Arthritis & Osteoporosis, Dr. Humaira Adenwalla and her team of arthritis specialists in New Jersey are here to help you treat your condition and improve your quality of life. We adopt the finest treatment procedures and diagnostic modalities to manage these conditions. Request an appointment today and let our team help you get on the road to recovery.

Diet Soda

The Possible Link Between Diet Soda and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Healthy living entails making better diet and lifestyle choices, including reducing sugar intake. Besides saving your teeth from the dreaded tooth decay, consuming less sugar can help you lose weight and reduce your risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Some people switch to cracking a can of diet soda as an “alternative.” After all, you can’t go wrong with a bottle of diet soda, can you?

Diet soda is the regular soda’s artificially sweetened, zero-calorie version. It is a mixture of carbonated water, artificial or natural sweeteners, colors, flavors, and other food additives, such as aspartame.

Aspartame is a common artificial sweetener in carbonated beverages to minimize sugar intake while providing sweet satisfaction.

So if you drink diet soda, will it increase your risk of having joint pains and inflammation? This article will answer the possible link between aspartame and rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Aspartame and Rheumatoid Arthritis

The American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first approved aspartame in 1983 for enhancing carbonated drinks. The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) stated that the FDA’s set acceptable daily aspartame intake is 50 milligrams per kilogram of your weight. For instance, your daily intake limit must be 3,409 milligrams if you weigh 150 pounds. Referencing the UAB, a 12-ounce can of diet soda with aspartame contains approximately 200 mg.

Aspartame is a chemical compound composed of phenylalanine, aspartic acid, and methanol. One study was conducted on rats consuming aspartame to determine its effects on oxidative stress. Results showed that the methanol from aspartame breakdown could trigger oxidative stress.

Oxidative stress is an imbalance between the production of the cells’ and tissues’ antioxidative systems and free radicals. Excessive production can lead to cellular dysfunction, genetic mutations, and inflammation.

Idaho Falls-based dietician Adrienne Dowd says that several studies suggest that aspartame can provoke an oxidative reaction in the body, leading to inflammation such as rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Sensitivity to Aspartame

It’s unclear why some people have higher aspartame sensitivity than others. The Arthritis Foundation found studies of aspartame’s mixed effects. However, if your body is sensitive to aspartame and develops rheumatoid arthritis, it could be that your immune system is responding and attacking the substance as a foreign body.

On the other hand, a study compared 48 people who experienced aspartame sensitivity with 48 more people who didn’t feel aspartame sensitivity. Each participant randomly received a sugary and an aspartame-free snack bar at least seven days apart. The results reported that regardless of the participants’ sensitivity, they had no adverse effects from the sugary snack bar.

 

The Connection Between Sodas and Bone Health

Besides aspartame, experts also raised concerns about soda’s adverse effects on bone health. For one, its phosphorus content can negatively affect calcium metabolism. While the International Osteoporosis Foundation states that the evidence doesn’t uphold this hypothesis, the caffeine content may deplete your body’s stored calcium.

Another concern was if soda also affected hip fractures. A major study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in September 2014 looked into this issue.

The study’s participants were nearly 74,000 postmenopausal women they tracked for up to 30 years. Researchers identified how much and what soda they regularly drank (regular, diet, caffeinated, or decaf). Results reported that their risk for hip fracture increased with their higher soda consumption.

While the exact reason why aspartame in soda affects bone density and increases the risk of rheumatoid arthritis is unknown, excessive soda consumption can reduce milk intake, leading to lower trace element consumption, such as calcium and magnesium.

The bottom line is you can reduce your risk of brittle bones and rheumatoid arthritis by lowering your aspartame intake. You must also cut off your sugar intake and see your doctor if you have adverse reactions.

 

Consult Arthritis Specialists Near You

Lowering aspartame intake can reduce your risk of chronic diseases and rheumatoid arthritis. While there are no apparent reasons it can directly affect bone health, it’s still best to cut your sugar intake as soon as possible, including diet soda.

At the Center for Arthritis & Osteoporosis, Dr. Adenwalla and her team of arthritis specialists in New Jersey adopt first-class treatment procedures and diagnostic modalities. We work hard to support our patients on their road to recovery. Contact us now to request an appointment.

 

PRP Therapy

Legitimate Ways to Improve Your PRP Therapy Results

Blood is responsible for a lot of important tasks in the human body. It brings oxygen and nutrients to your cells, and in exchange, your cells give your blood carbon dioxide and other waste materials to transport to the lungs, kidneys, and digestive system to be removed. Blood also fights infections and ensures your hormones reach their destinations; this is why modern science can now utilize a person’s blood to facilitate healing in the form of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections!

Also known as PRP therapy, this method uses blood from your body to help improve your appearance. This differs from Botox or dermal fillers, which do not use anything from your own body. PRP injections can help with healing injuries and making you look better. Thus, it’s no wonder that PRP therapy uses one of the most important fluids in the human body to facilitate healing. 

While this method is a miracle of science, there are ways a patient can further improve their PRP therapy results for better recovery. Some of these include:

 

Avoiding Vices

Your vices can harm your PRP treatment in a few ways. First, they can hamper the healing process. Smoking, for example, constricts blood vessels and reduces blood flow. This can make it more difficult for your body to heal properly and may increase the time to see results from your PRP treatment. 

Additionally, vices can also increase your risk of infection. Smoking is a known risk factor for infection; even a small infection can delay or even prevent your body from responding to PRP treatment. Substances like nicotine and alcohol can decrease the effectiveness of your stem cells and immune system. 

Smoking also reduces the number of stem cells, which is the opposite of what you want going into or out of your PRP treatment!

Finally, vices can also impact the quality of your PRP therapy. If you smoke, drink, do drugs, or engage in other similar vices, your session may not be as effective as it could be. If you want to ensure that your therapy is as effective as possible, it’s best to kick your vices to the curb.

 

Eating a More Leafy Green Diet

You should eat lots of leafy vegetables if you want to be healthy. These vegetables are packed with nutrients and fiber essential for good health. They contain lesser calories and fat and are great for weight loss or maintenance. So make sure to include plenty of leafy greens in your diet!

A simple dietary change can improve the results of your PRP treatment. Leafy greens increase your immunity, lower your cholesterol, and control your hormone levels, all of which can help improve your body’s healing response after a PRP procedure.

 

Exercise

PRP treatment can help improve your overall health, but it’s important to remember that you must do your part to maintain those results. A big part of that is exercising regularly.

Exercise—particularly in the morning—has been shown to increase your body’s production of platelets, which are essential for blood clotting and healing. High-intensity cardio workouts are particularly effective in improving platelet function and activation, making them more effective at healing wounds.

 

In Closing

These three legitimate ways will improve your therapy results and get you in shape! Do all of them before your next session to reap PRP’s benefits.

To know more about PRP therapy and other alternative healing methods, contact Dr. Adenwalla at the Center for Arthritis and Osteoporosis! We serve patients with the finest treatment procedures anchored on a foundation of compassion and care for a better recovery. Visit our website to learn about our treatments!

Osteoporosis

Essential Things You Should Know About Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a problem that too many people are facing today. It is a condition that causes the bones to become weak and fragile. The condition can sometimes lead to serious health problems, including fractures.

Several things can increase your risk of developing osteoporosis. These include being female, having a family history of the condition, over 65, and having a small frame.

In today’s article, let’s explore what you should know about osteoporosis and how it might affect you. Here’s what you need to know:

 

What are the Symptoms of Osteoporosis?

Pain is one of the main things people complain about when it comes to this condition. This can range from mild, intermittent pain to severe, chronic pain that limits your ability to perform everyday activities. Other symptoms of osteoporosis include:

• Decrease in height

• Hunched posture

• Loss of muscle mass

• Fragile skin

• Easy bruising

• Slow healing of cuts and bruises

• Joint pain

• Bone fractures

 

What Causes Osteoporosis?

A loss of bone density causes osteoporosis. This can happen for a variety of reasons. For the most part, osteoporosis is more common with age because your bone density begins to decline as you age.

Other risk factors for osteoporosis include:

• Family history

• Eating disorders

• Having a small body frame

• Being female

• Menopause

• Lack of exercise

• Smoking

• Excessive alcohol consumption

• Having a diet that lacks calcium and vitamin D

• Taking certain medications (such as steroids, anticonvulsants, and certain drugs for cancer)

 

How is Osteoporosis Diagnosed?

Osteoporosis is a silent disease because it can happen without any symptoms. The only way to diagnose osteoporosis is with a bone density scan. This scan uses low-dose X-rays to measure the density of your bones.

 

Can Osteoporosis Be Treated?

Unfortunately, there are no known cures for osteoporosis, but they can be treated. Treatment options include lifestyle changes, medications, and surgery.

Lifestyle changes that can help treat osteoporosis include getting enough calcium and vitamin D, exercising regularly, and quitting smoking—treating osteoporosis often involves taking medications like bisphosphonates and denosumab.

Surgery is sometimes necessary to treat osteoporosis. A hip replacement is the most common type of surgery that can help with this condition.

Although this is a severe condition, many people with osteoporosis can live long, healthy lives with proper treatment.

 

How to Prevent Osteoporosis?

You can do many things to prevent osteoporosis or keep it from getting worse. These include getting enough calcium and vitamin D, exercising, and avoiding tobacco and excessive alcohol use.

 

  • Calcium is vital for strong bones. It is the most abundant mineral in the human body and plays a crucial role in many physiological processes. Without calcium, bones would become brittle and susceptible to fractures.

 

  • Vitamin D is essential for our bones. It helps our bodies absorb calcium, which is necessary for bone growth and health. Vitamin D also helps prevent osteoporosis, a condition in which bones become weak and fragile. There are many ways to get vitamin D, including exposure to sunlight, certain foods, and supplements. Many people, however, do not get enough vitamin D and may need to take supplements to ensure they get enough.

 

  • One of the best ways to prevent osteoporosis is to engage in strength training. This exercise can help improve bone density and reduce the risk of fractures. Strength training can be performed using weights or resistance bands, and it’s essential to focus on all major muscle groups.

Taking steps to prevent osteoporosis can help you keep your bones healthy and reduce your risk of fractures.

 

The Bottom Line

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes bones to become weak and fragile. It can affect people of all ages but is most common in older adults. You can do many things to reduce your risk of developing osteoporosis or slow its progression if you have it. One of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about the condition.

If you are looking for an osteoporosis doctor in New Jersey, we can help you. At the Center for Arthritis and Osteoporosis, Dr. Adenwalla and her team adopt the finest treatment procedures and diagnostic modalities to manage disease states. We understand that living with Arthritis and autoimmune diseases can be an extremely stressful experience. We work to support our patients in their journey from pain to recovery with compassion and care. Contact us today to learn more and request an appointment online!

 

Lupus

What Is Lupus and What Are Its Symptoms

Lupus is a chronic disease that can cause inflammation and pain in any part of your body. It is an autoimmune disease, which means that the body’s immune system, which usually fights infections, attacks healthy tissue instead.

Lupus is difficult to diagnose because its symptoms can be similar to other illnesses. The most recognizable sign of lupus is a facial rash that looks like a butterfly spreading its wings across both cheeks. This occurs in many, but not all, cases of lupus.

Some people may be born with a higher risk of developing lupus, which can be triggered by infections, certain drugs, or exposure to sunlight. Lupus cannot be cured, but treatments may help control symptoms.

What Does Lupus Do to the Body?

Lupus is a chronic disease that can cause inflammation and pain in any part of your body. It can affect any body part, including the skin, joints, and organs.

Lupus occurs when something goes wrong with the immune system, and it begins to attack healthy tissue. This results in inflammation, pain, and damage to different areas of the body.

Lupus can be difficult to diagnose because its symptoms can be similar to other illnesses. The most recognizable sign of lupus is a facial rash that looks like a butterfly spreading its wings across both cheeks. This occurs in many, but not all, cases of lupus.

What Are the Symptoms of Lupus?

Lupus can cause a wide range of symptoms, varying in severity from person to person. Some people only have mild symptoms, while others may have more severe symptoms that can be life-threatening.

The most common symptoms of lupus include:

  • joint pain and swelling
  • muscle pain
  • fatigue
  • fever
  • rashes
  • headaches
  • hair loss
  • chest pain
  • dry eyes
  • dry mouth
  • numbness or tingling in the hands and feet
  • swelling in the legs, ankles, and feet

Lupus can also cause other serious health problems, such as:

  • kidney disease
  • heart disease
  • stroke
  • pulmonary hypertension
  • blood disorders
  • neurological problems
  • cancer

Lupus can be a severe disease, but with proper treatment, most people with lupus can live a normal life.

What Causes Lupus?

So far, what researchers know is that lupus occurs when the body’s immune system attacks healthy tissue. But its exact cause is unknown. However, researchers believe that genetic and environmental factors cause lupus. This does not mean lupus is contagious; it cannot be passed from person to person.

Who Is at Risk for Developing Lupus?

Lupus can develop in anyone, but women aged 15-44 and people from certain racial or ethnic groups are more likely to get the disease. People with a family member with lupus or another autoimmune disease are also at higher risk. Lupus is most common in women, with 9 out of ten people with the disease being female.

How Is Lupus Treated?

There is no cure for lupus. However, treatment can help control the symptoms of lupus and prevent complications. Treatment for lupus may include:

  • Anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Corticosteroids
  • Immunosuppressive drugs
  • Antimalarial drugs
  • Plasmapheresis
  • Biologic agents

Lupus can be a severe disease, but with proper treatment, most people with lupus can live a normal life.

Conclusion

Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that can affect any part of the body. While there is no cure for lupus, it is possible to manage the symptoms and flares with medication and lifestyle changes. With the proper treatment, people with lupus can live normal, healthy lives.

At the Center for Arthritis and Osteoporosis, Dr. Adenwalla and the team adopt the finest treatment procedures and diagnostic modalities to manage disease states. We understand that living with arthritis and autoimmune diseases can be an extremely stressful experience. We work to support our patients in their journey from pain to recovery with compassion, care, and employment employing high-end medical technologies like radiographs, MRIs, and ultrasound. If you need medical services in New Jersey, we’ve got you covered! Get in touch with us today and let us know how we can help!

 

Rheumatoid Arthritis

5 Lifestyle Changes for People with Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting more than just your joints. It often leads to fatigue, depression, and a lower quality of life. But making lifestyle changes can help you better manage the disease.

Aside from finding professional Rheumatoid arthritis services, here are some changes you can start yourself.

 

1. Choose Exercises with Less Pressure on the Joints

If you have rheumatoid arthritis, exercise is essential for maintaining joint function and overall health. However, certain types of exercise can put extra pressure on your joints, which can be painful.

That’s why choosing exercises that put less pressure on your joints is essential. Here are some examples:

 

  • Swimming — Swimming is an excellent exercise for people with RA because it’s low-impact and easy on the joints.
  • Walking — Walking is another low-impact exercise that’s easy on the joints. If you have RA, walk on level ground and use a cane or other supportive device if needed.
  • Stationary Biking — Biking is a great way to get your heart rate up without putting too much strain on your joints.
  • Yoga — Yoga can help improve flexibility and range of motion, which are important for people with RA.

 

2. Wear Comfortable Shoes

If you have rheumatoid arthritis, you know that the condition can cause pain, stiffness, and swelling in your joints. One of the best ways to help manage your symptoms is to wear comfortable shoes. Shoes can help reduce pressure on your joints and prevent further pain and damage.

Remember a few things to remember when choosing shoes if you have rheumatoid arthritis.

First, you want to make sure the shoes are comfortable. This means they should be well-cushioned and have a soft sole. They should be snug but not too tight.

Second, you want to choose shoes that provide support. This means they should have good arch support and a broad base. This will help reduce pressure on your joints and prevent further pain.

Finally, you want to make sure the shoes are durable. This means they should be made from high-quality materials that can withstand wear and tear.

 

3. Commit to an Anti-inflammatory Diet

One of the most important things you can do for your RA is to commit to an anti-inflammatory diet.

An anti-inflammatory diet is rich in whole, unprocessed foods like fruits, vegetables, healthy fats, and lean protein. It is low in sugar, refined carbohydrates, and unhealthy fats. This diet can help reduce inflammation throughout the body, which can, in turn, help reduce the symptoms of RA.

 

4. Avoid Junk Food

There are several foods to avoid for rheumatoid arthritis, and most of them fall under junk food. Junk food is often high in sugar and unhealthy fats, contributing to inflammation. Inflammation is a critical factor in rheumatoid arthritis, and eating foods that contribute to it can worsen the condition.

In addition, junk food is often low in nutrients, making it difficult to get the nutrients you need to manage rheumatoid arthritis.

 

5. Stick to a Proper Sleeping Schedule

Sleep helps your body repair and regenerate itself. Sleep is important for everyone, especially those with RA who constantly fight inflammation.

Moreover, sleep helps to reduce stress levels. This is also important for everyone, especially RA patients at a higher risk for stress and anxiety. Finally, sleep can help to improve your mood. Mood improvement is important for people with RA, who are at a higher risk for depression.

 

Final Thoughts

A few fundamental lifestyle changes can help manage the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. These include maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, eating a balanced diet, and managing stress. These changes can help reduce pain and inflammation and improve the overall quality of life.

Manage your RA better by scheduling consultations at the Center for Arthritis & Osteoporosis, home to the best arthritis specialists in New Jersey. We provide treatments for managing the disease, including infusion services, PRP therapy, and injections. Request an appointment to get started today.

 

Essential Things to Know About Trigger Point Injection

Essential Things to Know About Trigger Point Injection

Body aches are becoming far too common these days. Every other person is complaining of some sort of pain or discomfort. While some aches and pains are expected as we age, others can indicate a more serious problem.

There are a variety of different causes of body aches. Sometimes, it is simply due to overuse or strain. Other times, it could be a sign of an underlying medical condition. If you are frequently experiencing body aches, you must see a doctor to rule out any serious problems.

That said, there are a few things that you can do to help ease body aches—one of them being trigger point injections. Today, let’s take a closer look at trigger point injections. Here’s what you need to know:

 

What is a Trigger Point Injection?

A trigger point injection (TPI) is a treatment used to relieve pain in specific body areas. A trigger point is a tight, irritated spot in a muscle that can cause pain in other parts of the body. TPIs can be used to treat pain caused by trigger points.

Trigger points are usually found in the neck, shoulders, back, and hip muscles. However, they can also be found in other muscles throughout the body. TPIs can be used to treat pain in any muscle in the body.

 

How Does it Work?

A trigger point injection is a treatment for muscle pain. It is also called a myofascial trigger point injection. This type of injection is done to relieve pain in the muscles. The injection is given into the muscle. It is usually given with a needle.

The needle is inserted into the muscle. The doctor then injects a local anesthetic into the muscle. This numbs the area and helps to relieve the pain. The doctor may also inject a corticosteroid into the muscle. This helps to reduce inflammation.

Trigger point injections are usually done as a series of shots. The number of shots depends on the number of trigger points. The injections are usually given over a period of several weeks. Trigger point injections can be done in the doctor’s office. The procedure takes only a few minutes. You may feel some pain when the needle is inserted into the muscle.

After the injection, you may feel some soreness. This is normal. You may also have some bruising. This should go away in a few days. Trigger point injections can be a helpful treatment for muscle pain. If you have muscle pain, talk to your doctor about this treatment.

 

What to Expect After a Trigger Point Injection

A trigger point injection is a minimally invasive procedure to treat muscle pain and stiffness. The injection of a local anesthetic and steroid into the trigger point can help to reduce pain and improve the range of motion.

Most people who receive trigger point injections report significant pain relief. However, as with any medical procedure, there are potential risks and side effects. This blog post will discuss what you can expect after your trigger point injection.

Immediately following the procedure, you may feel a localized numbness or a sense of deep pressure. Don’t worry because it’s normal and caused by the injected local anesthetic. The numbness and pressure should resolve within a few hours.

 

The Bottom Line

It is important to remember that the local anesthetic injected into the trigger point will begin to wear off after a few hours. This means that you may begin to feel your muscle pain returning. However, the steroid injected will take a few days to take effect. Therefore, you should not expect to see the full benefits of the trigger point injection for a few days.

If you are looking for an arthritis doctor in New Jersey, we can help you. At the Center for Arthritis and Osteoporosis, Dr. Adenwalla and her team adopt the finest treatment procedures and diagnostic modalities to manage disease states. We understand that living with Arthritis and autoimmune diseases can be an extremely stressful experience. We work to support our patients in their journey from pain to recovery with compassion and care. Contact us today to learn more and request an appointment online!

 

Rheumatologist or Orthopedist: Which One Do I Go To?

Rheumatologist or Orthopedist: Which One Do I Go To?

With so many disciplines in medicine overlapping, it can be difficult to tell which kind of medical professional you need to visit. Two medical professionals that are commonly confused are rheumatologists and orthopedists. Keep reading below to learn more about these two specialists and which one you should be visiting.

 

What Does a Rheumatologist Do?

Rheumatologists are medical doctors who specialize in diagnosing and treating rheumatic diseases. Rheumatic diseases are conditions that affect the joints, muscles, and bones. They can be caused by various things, including autoimmune diseases, infections, and injuries.

Rheumatologists use a variety of tests to diagnose rheumatic diseases. These tests can include blood tests, X-rays, and MRI scans. Once a diagnosis is made, rheumatologists can provide treatment. Treatment options vary depending on the specific disease but can include medication, physical therapy, and surgery.

Rheumatologists play an essential role in the care of patients with rheumatic diseases. They can help improve quality of life and relieve pain and other symptoms.

 

What Does an Orthopedist Do?

An orthopedist is a medical doctor specializing in diagnosing and treating disorders of bones, joints, muscles, and ligaments. Orthopedists use various techniques to treat their patients, including medication, physical therapy, and surgery.

Orthopedists often treat patients with injuries, such as broken bones or sprains. They also treat conditions that cause pain in the bones, joints, or muscles, such as arthritis or back pain. Orthopedists may also treat patients who have had surgery to correct an injury or disorder.

Orthopedists use a variety of diagnostic tools to assess a patient’s condition. They may order X-rays, MRIs, or other imaging tests and request other laboratory tests. In some cases, an orthopedist may need to refer a patient to a specialist for further testing or treatment.

After diagnosing a condition, an orthopedist will develop a treatment plan. The type of treatment will depend on the severity of the situation and the preferences of the patient. Treatment may include medication, physical therapy, or surgery.

 

What Is the Difference Between a Rheumatologist and an Orthopedist?

The main difference between a rheumatologist and an orthopedist is that a rheumatologist is a medical doctor specializing in diagnosing and treating rheumatic diseases. In contrast, an orthopedist is a medical doctor specializing in diagnosing and treating musculoskeletal disorders.

Rheumatic diseases are conditions that affect the joints and tissues around the joints. Some common rheumatic diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, gout, and lupus. Orthopedic disorders, however, refer to problems with the bones, muscles, and ligaments, such as fractures, dislocations, and sprains.

While rheumatologists and orthopedists treat patients with joint problems, they do so differently. Rheumatologists treat the underlying disease causing the joint issues, while orthopedists focus on treating them.

 

Do I See a Rheumatologist or an Orthopedist for Arthritis?

Do you have arthritis? If so, you may wonder whether you should see a rheumatologist or an orthopedist. Both types of doctors treat arthritis, but they have different approaches.

Rheumatologists are specialists in treating arthritis and other diseases of the joints, muscles, and bones. They often use medication to treat these conditions. Orthopedists, however, focus on treating problems with the bones and muscles and may use surgery to treat some diseases.

So, which type of doctor should you see? It depends on your situation. If you have a complex arthritis condition that requires medication, you may need to see a rheumatologist. If you have a simple arthritis condition that can be treated with surgery, you may be able to see an orthopedist.

 

Conclusion

If you have joint pain, stiffness, or swelling, you must see a rheumatologist or orthopedist. These doctors are experts in diagnosing and treating conditions affecting joints, bones, and muscles. While rheumatologists and orthopedists can relieve joint pain, they have different areas of specialization. Rheumatologists focus on conditions that affect the joints, tendons, ligaments, and muscles, while orthopedists concentrate on problems with the bones and joints.

If you need an arthritis doctor in New Jersey, you can visit the Center for Arthritis & Osteoporosis. The team led by Dr. Adenwalla uses the best possible treatments and diagnostic methods to handle different diseases. Get in touch with us to book an appointment.

 

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